01) We are the only mammals that willingly delay sleep.

02) Have trouble waking up on Monday morning? Blame “social jet lag” from your altered weekend sleep schedule.

03) Finding it hard to get out of bed in the morning is a real condition called Dysania. It may signal a nutritional deficiency, depression or other problems.

04) Insomnia is not defined by the sleep you lose each night, but by the drowsiness, difficulty concentrating, headaches, irritability and other problems it causes each day.

05) Today, 75% of us dream in color. Before color television, just 15% of us did.

shutterstock_1044723601

06) Being awake for 16 hours straight decreases your performance as much as if your blood alcohol level were .05% (The legal limit is .08%).

07) Going without sleep is likely to make you hungry as levels of leptin (an appetite-regulating hormone) fall.

08) Sleeping on the job is less of a problem in Japan. Companies may accept it as a sign of exhaustion from overwork.

09) Regular exercise usually improves your sleep patterns. Exercising sporadically or right before bed may keep you up.

10) If it takes you less than 5 minutes to fall asleep, you’re probably sleep deprived. Ideally, falling asleep should take 10-15minutes.

shutterstock_520073314

shutterstock_132163337

01) More than 22 million Americans are dealing with sleep apnea right now.

02) 80% of moderate to severe sleep apnea cases are undiagnosed.

03) Sleep apnea symptoms include chronic snoring, waking up abruptly to the sensation of choking or gasping, excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia, awakening with a dry throat, morning headaches, and irritability.

04) Snoring doesn’t always equal sleep apnea, and sleep apnea doesn’t always equal snoring. Many sleep apnea patients don’t snore at all.

05) Individuals dealing with sleep apnea may awaken abruptly gasping for air upward of 30 times per hour during sleep.

06) Being male, overweight, middle-aged or older, and having a thick neck circumference are all risk factors for sleep apnea.

07) Sleep apnea affects women, too. Though women are eight times less likely to receive a diagnosis.

08) Up to 4% of children are dealing with sleep apnea, but it’s commonly misdiagnosed as “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)”.

09) Untreated sleep apnea can increase the risk of serious health problems, including heart disease and diabetes.

10) Managing sleep apnea is entirely possible with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy and/or lifestyle changes. Some lifestyle changes include losing weight, avoiding alcohol at night and quitting smoking.

 

Vitamins are substances that your body needs to grow and develop normally.  You can usually get all the vitamins you need from your diet, but your body can also make vitamin D and K.  At times, vitamins may need to be given as supplements when deficiencies are causing problems within the body.

Vitamins are nutrients essential for health and will help you lose and maintain your weight. While Vitamins alone can’t help you lose those unwanted pounds, not getting enough of certain ones may make the weight loss a little harder.

There are 13 vitamins your body needs, but these are the vitamins that may play a role in weight loss:

  • Vitamin A

Most Americans don’t meet the recommended intake of Vitamin A, according to the Office of Dietary Supplements. This fat-soluble vitamin plays an important role in regulating thyroid hormones. Therefore, not getting enough Vitamin A could result in lower thyroid hormones.

Adding Vitamin A rich foods like carrots, red peppers, spinach, mangos, cantaloupe, apricots, eggs, and salmon to your daily diet can keep your metabolism up.  Each person should get approximately 700 to 900 micrograms of Vitamin A daily.

  • B Vitamins — Vitamin B1 (thiamine), Vitamin B2 (riboflavin), Vitamin B3 (niacin), Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid), Vitamin B6, Vitamin B7 (biotin), Vitamin B12, and Folic Acid

B Vitamins make up a group of eight water-soluble vitamins that play an important role in metabolizing food into energy. B vitamins help control appetite and keep your energy level up.

A common misconception with B vitamins is since they are necessary components of your metabolism, you may think getting more of the B Vitamins in your diet will speed up your metabolism and help you lose weight. However, that’s not the case, because they’re water-soluble. Your body is unable to store B vitamins, and any excess you take beyond what you need is eliminated in your urine.

Foods like grains, veggies, meats, and beans will help you maintain appropriate levels of B vitamins.

  • Vitamin C

Vitamin C is another water-soluble vitamin. This vitamin is essential to losing weight and you may have a harder time losing fat if you are Vitamin C deficient. Increasing your intake of Vitamin C may help you burn as much as 30 percent more fat during moderate-intensity exercises, such as a brisk walk.

Oranges, broccoli, spinach, tomatoes, peppers, and strawberries are all good sources of Vitamin C. Adults need approximately 75 to 90 milligrams of Vitamin C a day.

  • Vitamin D

Low levels of Vitamin D are more common in obese people. Vitamin D may play a role in regulating fat mass, which could contribute to weight gain and obesity,

To improve your Vitamin D levels, be sure to add a variety of Vitamin D rich foods to your diet. These include salmon, eggs, tuna, and Vitamin D fortified milk.

 

Testosterone Hormone Replacement

Testosterone is the hormone that helps to maintain muscle mass, increase the number of calories you burn and may keep you motivated to stay physically active — all of which are associated with a lower risk of weight gain and obesity.

Testosterone replacement may promote weight loss in obese older men who have low levels of the male sex hormone. Testosterone levels can naturally be raised by losing belly fat, strength training, and getting enough sleep.

 


About Dr. Irfan Fazil, M.D. 
Dr. Irfan Fazil, M.D. is the medical director of Weight Loss Center of Yuma. Dr. Fazil has been in private practice for more than 10 years and has a great interest in the treatment of obesity.

Dr. Fazil graduated from Long Island College Hospital in Brooklyn, NY. He did his Internal Medicine Board and passed the American Board of Internal Medicine with the highest score possible, nationwide. He also did his fellowship in Nephrology from Long Island College Hospital in Brooklyn, NYC. He is also board certified in Nephrology.

Weight Loss Program March Seminar

On Friday, April 27th, Dr. Irfan Fazil, M.D. will be discussing “When Should We or Shouldn’t Ask Doctors to Prescribe Medical Marijuana”.

After the presentation, there will be a live question and answer session between patients and Dr. Fazil.

This seminar will be held April 27th  from 3pm to 5pm at:
BFC Event Center
3780 S 4th Ave, Suite C
Yuma, AZ 85365-4518

We will be holding a Graduation Ceremony for our Weight Loss Program Graduates after the presentation. These include patients who have lost weight and left the weight loss program.

Call or email our support group coordinator for more information at:
Telephone: (928) 919-0368
Email: weightloss@biofamilyclinic.com

About Dr. Irfan Fazil, M.D.

Dr. Irfan Fazil, M.D. is the medical director of Weight Loss Center of Yuma. Dr. Fazil has been in private practice for more than 10 years and has a great interest in the treatment of obesity.

Dr. Fazil graduated from Long Island College Hospital in Brooklyn, NY. He did his Internal Medicine Board and passed the American Board of Internal Medicine with the highest score possible, nationwide. He also did his fellowship in Nephrology from Long Island College Hospital in Brooklyn, NYC. He is also board certified in Nephrology.