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01) We are the only mammals that willingly delay sleep.

02) Have trouble waking up on Monday morning? Blame “social jet lag” from your altered weekend sleep schedule.

03) Finding it hard to get out of bed in the morning is a real condition called Dysania. It may signal a nutritional deficiency, depression or other problems.

04) Insomnia is not defined by the sleep you lose each night, but by the drowsiness, difficulty concentrating, headaches, irritability and other problems it causes each day.

05) Today, 75% of us dream in color. Before color television, just 15% of us did.

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06) Being awake for 16 hours straight decreases your performance as much as if your blood alcohol level were .05% (The legal limit is .08%).

07) Going without sleep is likely to make you hungry as levels of leptin (an appetite-regulating hormone) fall.

08) Sleeping on the job is less of a problem in Japan. Companies may accept it as a sign of exhaustion from overwork.

09) Regular exercise usually improves your sleep patterns. Exercising sporadically or right before bed may keep you up.

10) If it takes you less than 5 minutes to fall asleep, you’re probably sleep deprived. Ideally, falling asleep should take 10-15minutes.

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01) More than 22 million Americans are dealing with sleep apnea right now.

02) 80% of moderate to severe sleep apnea cases are undiagnosed.

03) Sleep apnea symptoms include chronic snoring, waking up abruptly to the sensation of choking or gasping, excessive daytime sleepiness, insomnia, awakening with a dry throat, morning headaches, and irritability.

04) Snoring doesn’t always equal sleep apnea, and sleep apnea doesn’t always equal snoring. Many sleep apnea patients don’t snore at all.

05) Individuals dealing with sleep apnea may awaken abruptly gasping for air upward of 30 times per hour during sleep.

06) Being male, overweight, middle-aged or older, and having a thick neck circumference are all risk factors for sleep apnea.

07) Sleep apnea affects women, too. Though women are eight times less likely to receive a diagnosis.

08) Up to 4% of children are dealing with sleep apnea, but it’s commonly misdiagnosed as “Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)”.

09) Untreated sleep apnea can increase the risk of serious health problems, including heart disease and diabetes.

10) Managing sleep apnea is entirely possible with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy and/or lifestyle changes. Some lifestyle changes include losing weight, avoiding alcohol at night and quitting smoking.

Dr. Fazil of the Weight Loss Center of Yuma has his own terms that he uses around the clinic. Below we have Dr. Fazil explain these terms and how they came about.

  • yummuWhat is the yummy diet?
    Since this weight loss program originated from Yuma, we say eat Yummy, that means you can eat whatever you want to eat – just watch total daily calories. Hence Yummy diet as there is no restriction on the type of food you eat.
  • What are ninja calories?
    Ninja calories are what sneak into yoninjaur mouth without intention to eat it in the first place and ultimately causes you weight gain. These are hidden calories that you don’t count for when planning meals. For example, ninja calories are when you want to restrict your calories, but then you hear an advertisement about buy one burger get the second one free and you eat twice as much. The second burger contains ninja calories.
  • What is low rider pants syndrome?low rider
    This term was coined by the patients of the Weight Loss Center of Yuma. They were losing weight so fast that their pants keep falling off and they refuse to buy new clothes. People in their neighborhood started saying they were wearing low rider pants! Now the Weight Loss Center of Yuma tells its patients at the start of the program that they will have to buy new clothes or they will develop “low rider pants syndrome”.

 

An interview with Dr. Irfan Fazil at Medical Weight Loss Center of Yuma

Dr. FazilThis month, Health Tips Magazine had the opportunity to interview Dr. Fazil about the Medical Weight Loss Center of Yuma.  The Weight Loss Center of Yuma has helped patients to lose over 30,000 pounds in the last year alone.

Health Tips Magazine (HTM): Dr. Fazil, how did you come up with the Medical Weight Loss Center of Yuma’s successful weight loss program?

Dr. Fazil: First, not all weight gain is due to overeating. One has to be careful and rule out other hidden medical conditions that can cause weight gain like low thyroid function, overproduction of cortisol, and other factors. Many medications can cause weight gain that needs to be addressed along with weight loss.

HTM: What kind of adjustments need to be made as a patient loses weight?

Dr. Fazil: In particular, when patients start to lose weight, we have to continuously adjust their medications. For example, if they are diabetic we have to lower medications they might be taking for diabetes. We also monitor their electrolytes to adjust electrolyte imbalances.

HTM: So, Dr. Fazil, what is the secret sauce to losing weight?

Dr. Fazil: There is no secret sauce! We find out basal metabolic rate of the patients and then prescribe the daily average calories to be consumed less than what they are burning. We train patients how to find calories in each food. We use proprietary software throughout the course of weight loss. We obtain graphs and we show them to patients. Obviously, the doctor has to know their medical conditions as well and treat them also to get the optimal results.

HTM: What is your success rate for weight loss with patients?

Dr. Fazil: I think it is more than 90 percent. We have hundreds of patients treated at our center and a majority of them have lost weight and graduated from our program.

HTM: What does graduating from the weight loss program mean?

Dr. Fazil: It means once a patient’s body mass index drops below 30, they no longer need to be on a medical weight loss program. Most patients continue to lose weight on their own successfully without needing to be supervised by a doctor constantly.